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Just got back from a massive 3 day, 3 city tour of Japan.  Totally shattered but fantastic teachers, some of the success stories were amazing!

I’ll write up more soon,  but a quick tip today from Ken in Tokyo

If you’re having problems explaining to parents just how good their kids will get in a way the parents understand,  emotionally resonate with and get impressed by …. he tells his parents:

I can promise you that if we work together and your children come to my classroom,  they’ll be speaking better English than the local Junior High School English teachers!

Now those of us in the know know that this is an unbelievably easy target to achieve, but to parents it sounds *very* impressive! :)

I’ve got a ton of tips, stories and more like this from teachers who’ve gone from zero to having waiting lists of students – as well as parents almost begging them to raise their prices! – so if you join a workshop, definitely join in the lunches and dinners too,  that’s where the real action is! :)

Thanks again to everyone and I’ll write up everything we did as soon as I work through my email inbox!

Be genki,

Richard


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Just so I don’t forget,  please remind me to do this in the (now sold out) workshops this weekend  - the New Animal Voices Picture Book!

animalspicturebook

 

Thanks to Nigel for the idea and if it goes well I’ll get the update on the site for you all soon!

Would you like me to try some of the games to go with it too?

Be genki,

Richard

 


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tanzaniareportIf you’re trying to persuade your school or Board of Education to choose Genki English then you can’t really ask for more than the research from Harvard University on using Genki English & Genki Phonics.

Quite a few people have asked me for the citations for the research, so here you go:

Schlemmer, Emily. (2012). Statistical Analysis of the ELT4Mafia pre and post testing data. Harvard
Graduate School of Education.

And of course the golden quote,  which was such a relief and made all the hard work worthwhile, was:

“Based on a variety of analyses, it has been confirmed that the …. program had a significant, positive and robust impact on students’ learning outcomes“.

You can read more about the project in the report here.

(And do check out the US State Department logo on the cover!)

There is also the UK’s Oxford University research into Genki English from last year showing how the Genki English songs and stories were equally effective for teaching English.

What is Genki English?

If you are wanting a description of Genki English to show your school, here is a Press Release that was released by the British Council (the UK’s public organisation for educational opportunities and cultural relations.)

About Genki English

Richard Graham founded GenkiEnglish.com, a provider of teaching materials and training based on the Japanese concept of “Genki”. He is now working with the University of Newcastle in the UK to bring this “Genkiness” to schools for low income families in India, China and Africa as well as working with the British Council in Japan.

The Genki approach to learning English works by engaging all of the learners senses and appealing to a wide range of learning styles. Children are engaged visually through the simple but striking graphics, aurally/orally through the simple chants and songs and limited amounts of graded vocabulary input and kinaesthetically through the actions and games. Because all of the learning tasks are organised as game-like activities, children are immediately motivated to take part. Tasks are achievable and learners receive positive feedback throughout the learning process. It is important that teachers realise that just using the materials is not enough, the way the materials are used are just as important to fully engage learners and maximise learning.

The University of Newcastle have also done considerable research into Genki English, with really encouraging results.   I don’t think their research has been made public, but you can read about the projects in the Boston Times and we also got an acknowledgment in Professor James Tooley’s A Beautiful Tree – which is a fantastic read!

Combine this with TV shows, Movie Stars,  TEDxgovernments (the government of Western Australia have also just adopted the GenkiJapan.net materials) , countless MA dissertations, plus all you guys getting amazing results with Genki English each & every day, then how can your school resist! :)

We’ve still got a long way to go though,  so thank you all for all your support!

Be genki,

Richard

P.S.  If you are planning on doing any research into Genki English as part of your MA, PhD or undergraduate research then please do get in touch.  I’m always looking to learn where we can make things better,  and you might also persuade me to get cracking on with my own PhD!

P.P.S.  Really looking forward to seeing you all in Tokyo, Osaka & Nagoya this weekend,  I’ve got some amazing new things planned for you! :)  And we might also be adding a new date in Spain in October!


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This is a great game that I used to use as an end of year review, lots of fun.

You can either use it in big groups, like I describe here.

(Or for smaller groups see lower down!)


1. Spread out lots of picture cards on the floor. (I used to use about 50 A4 cards at a time)

2. Put the kids into groups of about 5 or 6.

3. Two members from each group go upstairs along with the teacher who speaks the best English (if you are more than 1.)

4. The other members stay downstairs with the other teacher (if you have one!).


5. The upstairs kids have a piece of string (long enough to reach down to the floor below) which has magnet tied on the bottom. There is one for each team.

6. One of the kids from each upstairs team comes to the upstairs teacher and asks them today’s question.

7. The teacher tells them an answer using one of the picture cards below  (e.g.  What can you see?  with “I can see a dog”, “I can see a car” etc.)

8.   They go back to their fishing pole and their teammate below shouts the question up and the top kid repeats the answer the teacher just gave them.

9. The teammates search for that word amongst the picture cards.

10. When they’ve found the correct card they attach it to the magnet on the string.


11. The upstairs kids reel in the card.

12. They bring the card to the upstairs teacher, saying the English to them.

13.  They then re-ask the teacher the question who then tells them the next answer!

Remember to give each team different words to look for (otherwise you’ll have a big fight downstairs).

It’s also good to change the kids around (i.e. the upstairs kids go downstairs and the downstairs kids go upstairs) half way through.

Ninja Tip:  Thick string doesn’t tangle as much as thin string!

Fishing Game – For Smaller Groups

Or if you are in small groups, here’s a great version I learn at the ACET teacher’s meeting yesterday:

1.   Put fish minicards on a blue coloured mat.

photo 1

2.  The kids fish one fish each.  (Put a metal clip on each mini card, and again a magnet on the end of each string!)

3.  At the end give them a Fish Market sheet to fill in with the prices for each fish and how many of each they caught!

photo 2

4.  See which team got enough money to feed their families!

 

This is Japan so they were fishing sharks and all sorts.

But …. this is also a fantastic time to introduce some ecology if you wish and give the kids minus points for fishing endangered species or fish that are too small!

Or if you’re really into this type of thing, do check out the Sustainable Fishing Game!

Do let us know what you think in the comments!


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Any of you out there with a few design ideas you might like to share?

I’m working on putting all the Evaluation Worksheets into Curriculum Order ( just like the new software menu)

You can see the first two here:

workbookcover

 

But …. I’d really like to update the worksheets themselves.

Especially the straight lines at the top/bottom and the lyrics box.

I’d like to make it a bit less hard, and more genki and colourful.

Any of you have any design skills/ideas you’d like to share?

We just need something simple that can be replicated on all the other sheets.

Please do get in touch in the comments!

I’m sure everyone is wanting them as soon as possible!

Thanks!

Be genki,

Richard

P.S.   And if any of you know anyone with basic Adobe Flash skills, I’m also looking for an assistant to make up the other types of worksheets (and maybe games like Hugo’s the other day) for all the new themes.   It’s all template based, just copying, pasting, editing and exporting, doesn’t pay that much and is *very* boring, but it might be useful for a student or someone who wants a little extra part time work?

P.P.S.  And for the workshops next weekend, we’ve just moved into a bigger room for Osaka  so we’re re-opening registrations.  And we only have a few seats left for Nagoya & Tokyo.  Although I imagine they will probably go by Monday morning so if you want your yearly boost of Genki energy, get in touch ASAP!


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If you’re getting geared up for the big final this weekend,  here’s a great printable game from Hugo to go with the Come on, Come on lesson!

genkiorigami

Here’s Hugo’s video explanation of how to play it:

1. 1st kid says a number.

2. 2nd kid counts while opening/closing the origami

3. Then the 1st kid chooses 1 “I can..”

4. The 2nd kid opens the origami and the first kid says what they can do.  If the two match he/she gets a goal!

Hugo also has a How are you? version.  If you’d like to see it, or have them for any other themes, then do let us know in the comments!

And just in case you haven’t tried the song yet,  here’s John’s amazing kids in China – just look how fantastic they are!

Again if you’d like to see more videos of John’s kids then do let us know in the comments!

Be genki,

Richard

 


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Comment Competition: Every month I'll select a random comment to win a Genki English CD of your choice. Comment a lot and you have more chance of winning.